Other Geometers

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Small Seraphim can also be distinguished by the toothed cross-band and white crossline near the outside edge of the forewing.

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Seraphim is similar but is seen mainly in May, June and July and are generally smaller. Seraphim is about 14mm and Small Seraphim even smaller at about 11mm.

2. Mottled Grey, Early Tooth-striped, Seraphim and Small Seraphim
Mottled Grey and Early Tooth-Striped
are grey moths seen mainly in March and April

Other confusing geometers

Other Geometers

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Some other common geometers which are easy to confuse

1. Maiden’s Blush, Blood-vein, Small Blood-vein, Clay Triple Lines

2. Treble Bar and Lesser Treble Bar

3. Mottled Grey, Early Tooth-striped, Seraphim, Small Seraphim

4. Peacock and Sharp-Angled Peacock           

Peacock Moth                                                                 Sharp angled Peacock

The curved mark at the edge of the forewing near the tip is thin and only slightly curved - so the tip of the wing appears rounder

The curved mark at the edge of the forewing near the tip is thick and dark and more curved - so the tip of the wing appears sharply angled.

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Treble Bar                                                                       Lesser Treble Bar

The cross-line near the base of the forewing curves gently round to the leading edge of the wing

The cross-line near the base of the forewing is pointed before it meets the leading edge of the wing

Blood-vein                                                                       Small Blood-vein

Main cross-line passes through the tip of the forewing.

Flight period May-September

Main cross-line curves round to meet leading edge of the forewing.

Cross-line near outer edge is continuous

Flight period May-August

Clay Triple lines                                     

Main cross-line curves round as in Small Blood-vein.


Main cross-line curves round as in Small Blood-vein and Clay Triple Lines.


The Clay Triple lines shown is of the first generation - flight period May-June. The later second generation is unlikely to be confused with Maiden’s Blush or Small Blood-Vein.

Check also Blair’s Mocha - not shown

Tip of the forewing more hooked than in Small Blood-vein.


Cross-line near outer edge is continuous but has dots along it

Maiden’s Blush

The other two cross-lines are broken into dots

The forewing is unevenly flushed with pink

Some Maiden’s Blush moths have large blotches near the outer edge of the wing

1. Maiden’s Blush, Blood-vein, Small Blood-vein, Clay Triple Lines
Four large moths with similar wing shapes and similar cross-lines


2. Treble Bar and Lesser Treble Bar
Both species are found in a wide range of habitats over a long period during the summer.


Mottled Grey wing length about 15mm
Mottled Grey is triangular in shape

Mottled Grey has a cross-line of
white chevrons near the outside of the forewing.

Early Tooth-striped wing length about 16mm
The outside edge of the forewings of Early Tooth-striped curve up to the body.

Early Tooth-striped often has a striking zig-zag mark in the centre of the forewing.

It usually has more definite cross-bands than Mottled Grey